OCTOBER 1998 -- GOOD OLD BOAT NEWSLETTER

 

WELCOME TO OUR FIRST NEWSLETTER!
We thrive on being a little different. What other magazine do you know that publishes newsletters (of all things) on alternate months? Welcome to the premier issue of the Good Old Boat newsletter! Like the magazine, it's being developed as we go. The newsletter is meant to get a little more information delivered to you in between magazines: Mail Buoy letters, directory revisions, and other pertinent "stuff" such as housekeeping items we want to run by our subscribers. We look forward to your comments and suggestions. So on with the housekeeping items:

EMAIL OR U.S. POST?
We prefer to email this newsletter to you to get it there faster and to save on printing and postage costs. We aim to please, however, so if you prefer to have a printed copy, that's always an option.

We don't want to lose track of even one good old boater, so please keep us informed about your whereabouts. If your postal address or email address changes, please let us know. Good Old Boat magazine is mailed third class which means the post office will not forward it to you, even if they know your address! Instead they let us know you've moved, and they give us an address, if we're lucky. Then we've got to send you another magazine. All this really slows delivery to you.

YOU MAY HAVE WONDERED
There are several categories of "membership" in our community of good old boat sailors. Some are subscribers. They've seen the magazine and sent their checks. We're grateful for them all. And we need many more like them! (So tell your fellow sailors, if they seem like the Good Old Boat reader types.)

Another group has asked to sample an issue of the magazine. They're our potential subscribers. We're hoping to receive the checks which will make them paid subscribers.

There is another group -- the email updates list. These people visited our website and filled in a note there asking to receive ongoing updates by email. Email updates are not the same as this newsletter. We just sent an update on Sunday, Oct. 18. These notes are infrequent missives telling people what's new at Good Old Boat and on our website. While some of the people on this list also happen to be subscribers and potential subscribers, they do not need to be. And subscribers are not automatically added to the email updates list. We don't put anyone on that list without specific permission. If you'd like to be on the email updates list and think you are not, please send an email message to updates@goodoldboat.com.

A wrench fell in the cogs of the email update process just before we left for our vacation in August. We had a crash on Karen's computer and lost the data file for members of the email updates list. Most of the names (90 percent or so) were recaptured, but if you think you're on that list and did not receive the recent update notice, you'll have to ask us to be added again. Sorry.

WE WON'T SELL YOUR NAME!
By the way, several people have asked us when signing up that we not release their names. We're sure that's a fine way for publishers to make a little extra money. But that's not for us. Your name is safe with us. No sales. We promise.

ADVERTISING IS THE ANSWER
The feedback from our readers is overwhelmingly in favor of having advertising in Good Old Boat magazine. Frankly, this surprised us and has required that we change our thinking and learn a few new skills.

Readers are telling us they want information about who's out there selling the parts and services good old boaters need. We can go part way toward providing this information with our directory of services and equipment (see below), but suppliers can expand upon their listings and give you information in their own words through advertising.

We think our magazine might be a good way for smaller marine suppliers to run cost-effective and informative advertising targeted to readers who are interested in what they have to sell. So, particularly while our circulation is not large yet, the price structure for our ads may present a very attractive opportunity.

We've been concerned from the beginning that advertisers should not be able to influence or compromise our editorial content. We're still in the process of developing guidelines to insure this. But the philosophy is firmly in place.

It is our intention that advertising be used to inform-- rather than to manipulate or overwhelm -- our readers. We'll attempt to group information from advertisers in the front and the back of the magazine, rather than scattering it throughout our editorial pages. And we will never let the number of advertising pages subtract from the number of editorial pages. If you have comments or suggestions about how we can bring advertisers and readers together in a way that meets these objectives, we'd like to hear from you.

HELP US WITH OUR DIRECTORY OF SUPPLIERS
One of our next big projects is to create a directory of resources for good old boaters. Our goal is to list the resources that might be a little hard to find. It is our intention that the directory be fairly small, so some of the more obscure sources are not lost in the shuffle. Some suppliers that are already well known won't be listed. A number of good directories are already out there for sailors. They're good references, and we don't intend to duplicate these. Instead we'll make note of them in our directory.

The suppliers we're looking for are those which might be a little hard to find and known only in their region or community, and because of this, we're asking for your help in identifying them. If you have some favorite suppliers that other sailors might not know about, please tell us. If you've had a good relationship with a lender who is willing to loan money for the purchase of a good old boat, for example, please let us know. We're looking for similar endorsements of insurance companies, surveyors, and especially for those suppliers of hard-to-find replacement parts (sometimes specifically for certain makes or models). Listing in this directory will be at no cost to them because we want it to be complete.

AND FINALLY, TELL US ABOUT GOOD CLASSIFIED AD LISTS
We're planning to improve our website's classified ad section. In an effort to provide a full service rather than to compete, we would like to offer links to other good classified ad services from our page. A few of these are up already. I won't link them here; they're linked on our website. They are:

Dejanews - http://www.dejanews.com
BOAT/U.S. - http://boatus.com/classified/
48 Degrees North - http://www.48north.com/classads/boats.htm
Starboard Tack - http://www.starboardtack.com
Latitude 38 - http://www.latitude38.com/clasindx.htm
Yacht World - http://www.yachtworld.com
Canadian Yachting - http://www.canyacht.com/clascont.html
LiveAboard Online Magazine - http://www.LMMC.com/classifieds/class04.html
Ottawa Sailing River - http://www.magma.ca/~mcsail/ott/for-sale.htm
Recreational Boat Building Industry - http://www.rbbi.com/
Marketplace Newsgroup - Newsgroup for sailors who are buying and selling - news:rec.boats.marketplace

We will be searching for web addresses for Soundings, Boats for Sale, Boat Show Case, Yachts 101, Boat Mall, and Boat Net. If you know any of these addresses, you can save us the trouble. And who else is out there? If you know of other good classified ad websites for boats or boated-related equipment, tell us, and we'll put up a link.

ALUMINUM TANK TALK
We are collecting information on aluminum tanks. One reader contacted us about the problems she's had with aluminum water tanks and an aluminum waste tank on her boat. If you have aluminum tanks on your boat, we'd like to hear from you, whether you're having problems or not. That helps us determine how widespread this problem is. We have a 20-gallon aluminum tank under the cockpit of our C&C 30 that holds diesel fuel. It has not had any leaks or caused any other problems.

If you've had trouble with your aluminum tanks and have solved the problem, we would like to know what your solution was. The January/February issue of Good Old Boat will address tanks and associated issues. The deadline for that issue is coming right up, so if you have any hints to share, please contact us right away! Thanks.

WHAT KIND OF ENGINE DO YOU HAVE?
We've given a fair amount of coverage to the Atomic 4 engine and will give more coverage to that engine in the future (particularly since we are featuring Moyer Marine in the January/February issue), but we plan to cover some other popular engines as well. Consider this to be an informal survey to find out what other engines are out there in some quantity.

Tell us what kind of engine you have in your boat, and what kinds of issues are worth covering concerning that engine.

How to contact us:
Jerry Powlas
Good Old Boat Magazine
7340 Niagara Lane North
Maple Grove, MN 55311-2655
763-420-8923
763-420-8921 (fax)
jerry@goodoldboat.com

WANTED: FIXER-UPPER BOATS AND "UPPER-FIXER" SAILORS
Some people are looking for a good old boat that needs major fixing up. But it's hard to find a good fixer-upper; they often are not worth advertising or brokering. At the same time, abandoned and deteriorating boats are sitting in boatyards or back yards, with boatyard owners or boat owners wondering how they will ever get rid of that eyesore.

Good Old Boat magazine wants to help match any person who wants to fix up an old boat with the boat. We will establish a web page linked to our home page at www.goodoldboat.com that will list boats available for restoration. Here's how it will work:

We will invite boatyard owners with abandoned, deteriorated boats to contact us to list these boats. If you own an abandoned deteriorated good old boat, contact us. If you see one, try to get the right person to contact us: karen@goodoldboat.com or Good Old Boat, 7340 Niagara Lane North, Maple Grove MN 55311-2655.

Our website list will provide minimal information: length overall, class or design, basic information such as whether the boat has (or lacks) an engine and rig, location, and contact information -- presumably a telephone number and or mail address. We expect our list will include boats with these characteristics:

1. The boats will need major restoration work -- perhaps deck recoring, hull structural/blister repair, refinishing, rigging, repowering, etc.
2. There may be some complicated issues in transferring title, if boatyard storage bills exceed the value of the boat and liens are attached to the boat. Needless to say, Good Old Boat magazine will not be involved in sorting out these issues.
3. We presume that these abandoned/deteriorated boats will be sold in the range of 15-25 percent of the BUC book prices. If sister ships of that boat sell in the $40k range, we presume a boat in need of full overhaul would trade in the $6-10k range, or a bit more if the overhaul would be "substantial" but not "complete." We also presume that buyers would be dealing directly with boat owners (or lien holders), and that brokers are not involved in these matters. If brokers are involved, we would expect them to advertise these boats.
4. Good Old Boat magazine assumes no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the listings or for the underlying suitability of a boat for restoration. Buyers are urged to contact marine surveyors to determine the full extent of work that will have to be done. Boat restoration takes a lot of work and materials, and parts can be quite costly. You can end up with a great boat, but don't go into this presuming you can make money by selling the finished product.

IN OTHER NEWS

IF YOU HAVE A WOODEN BOAT
The folks at WoodenBoat magazine are working on the third volume of their Register of Wooden Yachts. The first volume lists about 5,000 boats, and the second lists about 1,000 more. Their goal is to list another 1,000 boats in the third volume.

There is no charge for listing your boat, and it seems to us that it would be a nice thing to do. If you have a good old wooden boat, chances are you have some strong feelings about preserving a piece of marine history in living and functioning form. Listing your boat could be a part of that. To qualify for a listing in the Register of Wooden Yachts, your boat should be 20 feet or longer and have a home port in the United States or Canada. There is a simple form to fill out that may be obtained from the publishers of WoodenBoat. Contact:

Anne Bray
WoodenBoat
P.O. Box 78
Naskeag Road
Brooklin, ME 04616
207-359-4651
207-359-8920 (fax)
www.woodenboat.com (web)
matt@woodenboat.com (email)

MODIFIED TYVEK SLEEVES INCREASE COMFORT
Tyvek sleeves protect boaters' arms and wrists when they are working with epoxy and fiberglass materials. They are especially important during lengthy laminating jobs, when exposure risk is the greatest. However, in warm weather the sleeves can trap body heat and be uncomfortable.

For additional ventilation, cut one or two large slits or several smaller holes in the upper arm end of the sleeve. This increases comfort for the upper arm when working in warm or humid conditions, while leaving the lower section intact for protection from uncured epoxy and fiberglass contamination.

For additional comfort and protection, Tom Dalzell of Pickering, Ontario, Canada, suggests applying talcum powder to eliminate fiberglass itch. The talc will create a dry surface powder coating on the skin, preventing fiberglass barbs from sticking.

These suggestions come from Tom Pawlak, technical editor with Gougeon Brothers. Gougeon Brothers can be contacted at 517-684-7286; http://www.westsystem.com.

MAIL BUOY

YOU THINK YOU GOT TROUBLE? WE GOT THIS EMAIL RECENTLY:
Great magazine: please sign me up. Using Don Casey's This Old Boat, we have done extensive renovations on Slow Dancin' III (1973 36-foot Morgan Out Island) to change her from the standard sleeps-six configuration to almost luxurious accommodations for two. We began by removing the V-berth and forward head and installing a U-shaped galley in the space made vacant. This modification also gave us room to install a new bulkhead forward of the new galley which gives about five feet of room for the refrigerator compressor and a two-tank propane locker for Sandee's new range. Of course locating the galley forward meant pulling out the old galley that resided on the starboard side of the saloon. We replaced this with an 8-inch raised dais on which we mounted leather swivel chairs with a small table/wine locker between. This change permitted the addition of a large chart table and nav station at the aft saloon bulkhead.

We removed the table and aft seat from the saloon's port side and replaced it with a settee which converts into a double berth. The after bulkhead shelf on the port side became a bookcase with built in TV. In the aft cabin, we removed the port and starboard shelves and installed lockers with louvered doors. We also changed the skimpy berth to a downtown double-bed foam mattress which we installed athwartship. Because we had been zapped by lightning last year, I installed completely new AC and DC wiring, electrical components, and some new navigation instruments. To finish off, Sandee painted the entire inside with Pettit Yacht Interior eggshell white, covering that awful dark brown phony teak. I installed ceilings of natural cypress throughout and filled more than 300 screw holes with shaved and sanded cypress bungs. The final touch was to have been a new teak and holly sole with a little light blue indoor/outdoor carpeting over the dais.

The only thing we contracted out was the installation of a new Westerbeke 4-108 diesel, and that was how disaster struck! On installation, we opted for a Packless Sealing System instead of the conventional stuffing box. Nothing wrong with that, providing it is installed correctly. Our contractor, in my opinion, committed two errors. First he did not dimple the propeller shaft to hold the plate's set screws captive nor did he lock them in with Locktite or a similar product. The result was that the set screws backed off allowing the plate to slide up the shaft. This permitted enough water to enter in 18 hours to sink her in about 12 ft of water. We had gone ashore for the night and then to the nearest Boat/U.S. store to buy a third anchor in preparation for the expected strong winds associated with Hurricane Georges.

As a service to other good old boaters, you might wish to include a "heads up" or special inspection on PSS installation in a future issue. To finish this story, TowBoat/U.S. was called and arrived within 15 minutes. They had us pumped out and afloat within the hour. They notified our insurance company and a master mechanic, as we were towed to a nearby marina. The mechanic met us at the jetty and immediately began to do what was needed to pickle the engine to prevent salt water damage. I contacted our insurance.

All of the above to ask Don Casey a couple of simple questions:
1. Since the boat was submerged probably less than 12 hours, what must I do to restore her and prevent any musty odor from forming? There seems to be very little damage except for one strip of ceiling and a couple of warped tables. I sprayed the electrical panels and their connections with WD-40, but I'm limited to what I can do until the adjuster has viewed the damage.
2. Because we are on a limited budget, I expect to do the repairs and cleaning myself. What do you think is a fair hourly rate to ask of the insurance company?

We have a lot of faith and have not lost our sense of humor.
Pat Patterson
Jensen Beach, Fla.

DON RESPONDS
First, my sympathies for your plight. However, the tone of your letter suggests you have the right attitude to get through this. I have never had to deal with your situation, so please take the following remarks as suggestions, and listen to other, more knowledgeable, advice if you can get it.

On the subject of cleanup, except for non-marine plywood, for the most part the structure of the boat should be unaffected by its dunking. Boats offshore often have sea water sloshing around in various parts of the hull for days on end with no detrimental consequences. The problem is not the water but the salt and, to a lesser degree (other than olfactory consequences), the organic material that came aboard with the water. As soon as possible, get inside with a garden hose and try to sink the boat again. By that, I mean you need to flush every nook and cranny with fresh water to remove all the salt. Otherwise, the interior of the boat will be forever damp -- like blue jeans washed in sea water -- and the musty odor you imagine will turn into reality. So wash, wash, wash. The hard part is finding access to "dead" spaces. For example, it seems to me that the OIs had molded overhead liners. If that is right, water has certainly filled the space between the liner and the cabintop, and you will need to find a way to flush that area. It may require drilling some access holes You mentioned a new ceiling: unfortunately, you need to wash behind that. If you installed it with a traditional gap between boards, that won't be a problem (old-timers knew what they were doing), but if it is solid, then you are going to have to remove the top and bottom boards at least to allow flushing the space behind. Under and behind tanks can be another difficult area to flush. And by the way, don't forget that seawater, no doubt, entered all your tanks -- fuel and water -- so they need to be pumped out and flushed.

I am sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but your biggest problem -- after the engine, which is being handled professionally (I hope!) -- is your electrical system. When a boat sinks in salt water, ALL the wiring is usually toast. It will look fine now, but the water has wicked along the strands to the wire's interior, and salt in there means corrosion can't be far behind. Your insurance should pay to have the boat completely rewired. Anything less is a safety risk. Also, if your batteries are wet cells, they may be damaged.

Most fabrics can be laundered or hosed in situ to remove the salt, but foam is generally problematic. You might get the salt out of foam cushions by submerging them repeatedly in fresh water and then squeezing the water out, but expect it to take a while. If you try to salvage foam, after you wash it and let it dry uncovered a couple of days in the sun, spray it heavily with Lysol to prevent mildew. Then leave the foam uncovered as long as you can so the interior will dry.

Speaking of drying, when you are finished washing the boat's interior, borrow as many fans as you can and blow them through all the boats spaces -- lockers, cabinets, under drawers, etc.-- and let them run for several days. After removing the salt, circulating air is what the interior most needs. Once the interior is dry, misting it with Lysol will help prevent the growth of any critters inevitably left behind.

As for your second question, I doubt that your insurance company will want to arrive at a settlement number that way. You will almost certainly be better off getting a professional estimate -- two if possible -- on what it will cost to put your boat back into the condition it was in just prior to sinking and then let the insurance company pay you that amount. Most insurance companies send out their own adjuster, and you may be surprised at how generous they can be. But keep in mind that the cost, both in time and money, will be about two and a half times what you estimate (Casey's Rule), so if the settlement amount the adjuster comes up with doesn't make you feel like they are giving away money, it is too low. Don't be afraid to tell them it's too low. Insurance companies these days just make up claims with higher premiums -- for all of us, not just you -- so they are generally pretty good about paying whatever it costs to put it right.

I hope some of this is helpful. Good luck. Maintain that positive outlook, and there will indeed be a "happily ever after."
Don Casey
Miami, Fla.

GOT A PUZZLER FOR YOU
Hey, great magazine! I will be subscribing. In the meantime, I have a puzzler for you. I replaced all my bronze thru-hulls and seacocks on my great old boat (Pearson Vanguard 1966 #344). Only thing not serviced was the stuffing box. That unit almost sank me, but we repacked it (and reattached it to the stern tube!). I still get water in the bilge. Your article on exhaust systems last month made me wonder if my bilge pump might be the culprit. It is a Beckson navy-style piston pump, which I rebuilt, which is permanently mounted to the cockpit wall with access to the handle via a large screw on deck plate. It discharges to a thru-hull well below the waterline at 22 GPM (if you are built like an ape). The intake of course, is in the bilge. Is this not a classic situation for a siphon effect to take place?
Jim Pendoley
Amesbury, Mass.

Jim,
I'm not sure why that pump arrangement has not sunk your boat yet. Maybe the one-way valves in the manual pump have saved the day. If the pump were a standard electric type, your boat would have gone down by now. Some water in the bilge may be "normal" in that the shaft packing might drip a little even when the shaft is not turning. I think the ideal is a little drip when turning and none when stopped. It is better, however, to have a little weep than to adjust it so tightly that it gets hot. We naturally recommend that you remount the pump discharge high up near the hull deck joint.

PUZZLER: THE NEXT CHAPTER
Looks like we all agree on the bilge pump issue. Here is the manufacturer's response (see below). Pearson seems to have built Vanguards with this inherently dangerous thru-hull outlet. It's nothing more than a glass tube, well below the waterline, to which the bilge pump discharge is attached. No seacock. I will be glassing it over and relocating it above the waterline.
Jim Pendoley
Amesbury, Mass.

Dear Mr. Pendoley,
The only thing preventing the siphoning action from taking place is the foot valve on the pump. This, however, is not a sealing valve. If debris were to get into the foot valve, there is a possibility of failure and leaking.Why is the pump outlet below water? It really shouldn't be. I would not trust the foot valve to seal water out permanently. Leaking is quite possible with this outlet submersed.
Thomas Beckson

MILDEW DO'S AND DONT'S
I have an old mildew problem on my new (1970) Morgan 22. Before I paint below -- mostly on the non-gelcoat places -- I need to clean. I understand that acetone should be used last -- to get rid of wax. My question is whether it is safe to use bleach -- I read in one source (some old Morgan 22 info) that chlorine cleaning products should be avoided. Is this true? Does it apply to the gelcoat only? What is recommended for cleaning? I plan to paint with Pettit Dura White. Love your magazine and web site!!!
Michael Kamen
Auburn, Ala.

Michael,
I'm not too enthusiastic about chlorine, in any form, including bleach. My knowledge is mostly from experience, and so is not very general. When people tell you that, seek additional advice to confirm what they say.

I don't know what bleach does to exterior gelcoat. It could be the safest and least harmful place to use bleach. We tried bleach in our water tanks, and my throat got very sore from drinking the water. It took a lot of flushing to get the chlorine out to the degree that it didn't affect my throat. From this I'd judge that very small amounts of chlorine in the water tanks can affect some people adversely. I can withstand the chlorine levels in city drinking water. It's probably an individual thing.

We had a mildew war on our boat several years ago. We used fairly concentrated levels of bleach in water to clean and kill mildew. The bleach did the job on the mildew for a while, but made both of us pretty sick from the fumes. It also started corroding our stainless steel keel bolts and nuts. The cleaner gets into the bilge water, naturally, and attacks those vital bolts. So now we don't use bleach at all. We don't have it on the boat for any purpose. We also don't use the chlorine-based water sterilization tablets. We use filters. They work.

There are bathroom cleaners and kitchen counter sterilizers that will also kill mildew, and in fact seem to do a better job. The common ingredient in these cleaners seems to be alkyl dimethyl bezyl ammonium chloride. They also contain some detergents and grease-cutting agents. A typical product is Lysol Antibacterial Kitchen Cleaner. The same ingredient is found in some bathroom cleaners, but they are stronger and have other chemicals that make them less appropriate for food surfaces. They're OK except in the galley. Kitchen and bathroom cleaners are a lot easier to live with.

Where wood is involved, we like to use lemon oil after we kill the mildew with kitchen or bathroom cleaner. Lemon oil is harder to find but worth it. The product we use is Parker & Bailey Lemon Oil (not polish), 141 Middle Street, Portland, Maine 04101. It kills mildew, too, and prevents it from growing back. It also smells nice, is easy on your hands, and is safe on food surfaces. It makes the wood look nice, too. We learned about the lemon oil from Don Casey's book, This Old Boat.

I don't know how any of these things affect the painting process, except that I'm fairly sure the oil won't help matters under paint. Test a little panel first to make sure there won't be a problem with the others. The kitchen and bathroom cleaners can probably be rinsed off with water.

Acetone is great stuff. Recent studies suggest that it is not as nasty as previously thought. That is all well and good, but try not to get it on your skin, don't breathe the vapors, and be very careful about explosive concentrations in enclosed spaces. Acetone is very volatile; I've read that the heat from ordinary friction can ignite it. So use it with caution. Most paints recommend a cleaner. That is worth considering, but the same cautions probably apply, and the stuff might be even less healthy than acetone.

It is tough painting inside a boat, more so than a house, because the space is so much smaller. Bring fans and ventilate. Let us know what you do and how it works. By the way, we've got an article on mildew planned for our May/June issue.

  

MORE CONTACTS AND SAILING ASSOCIATIONS

This is a list of changes we've added since the premier issue of Good Old Boat came out in June. Because that list was 14 pages long, we didn't want to reprint it in its entirety in the newsletter. We'll run changes and additions in each newsletter and a full list again in the May issue of Good Old Boat magazine. Until then, it is available in its entirety on our website at http://www.goodoldboat.com/associations.html. Because all this is there, we've left the links out of this listing. We've just put this version of the newsletter up for those whose browsers are troubled by line wraps and other mysterious computer anomalies.

With the help of our readers, this list will expand to include all good old boats with heads, galleys, and bunks. We realize there are many more boats out there that are also good old boats, but that's our focus for now. It already seems broader than we could have imagined. This list includes:

Please let us know about any boat or contact we've overlooked.

These listings are very out of date. Please see the Good Old Boat website
for up-to-date lists of advertisers, associations and suppliers.

A

Alacrity and Vivacity Club (twin-keelers)
Kenneth Butterly
8725 W. Stolting Road
Niles, IL 60714
847-384-1605
condordbms@email.msn.com
Kenneth says, "We are a new club sailing old boats and looking for additional members in the U.S. and the U.K."
(also see Twin-Keeler Newsletter)

Alberg 30 Page (West Coast)
Rick Leach
rleach@mbayaq.org
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/Alberg30/

Alberg 37 International Owners' Association
Tom and Kaye Assenmacher
Box 32
Kinsale, VA 22488
804-472-3853

Alden
Leland and Eloise Gilmore
10017 Quinby St.
Silver Spring, MD 20901
301-593-5530
eloise.gilmore@NOAA.GOV

Allied Princess 36
Todd Dunn
P.O. Box 1261
Houlton, ME 04730
506-447-3195 (days)
506-459-4632 (evenings)
expet@unb.ca
http://www.geocities.com/TheTropics/8005/AP36PAGE.html

Allied Princess Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/alliedprincess/index.htm

Allied Seawind II Website
Howard Hering
12808 Middlevale Lane
Silver Spring, MD 20906
301-949-4178 (phone and fax)
hhassoc@erols.com
http://www.geocities.com/TheTropics/paradise/1131/

Aloha 34 Owners' International Network
Migs Turner
1386 Oliver St.
Victoria, British Columbia
Canada V8S 4X2
250-592-1198

American 26
Danny Covington
1735 Ashley Hall Rd., Apt. 325
Charleston, SC 29407
843-769-0292
Drcov@aol.com

Antrim 27
Richard Ray
http://www.A27class.org/

Arctic Motorsailers (see Nimble Boat Club)

Aquarius 23
Jeremy White
1711 NE Darby
Hillsboro, OR 97124
503-640-8292
jwhite@coho.net

B

Bayfield Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/bayfield/index.htm

Bayfield 40 Newsletter
Doug and Carol Kelly
10439 Golden Trail
Millersburg, MI 49757-9621
715-734-3886
messmouse@george.lhi.net

Beneteau Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/beneteau/index.htm

Bentley 38
Allan Warman
1526 NW 60th St.
Seattle, WA 98107-2328
206-789-2194
namraw@email.msn.com

Brewer 43
Udo Nittner
Box 108
Mendocion, CA 95460
thegoose@mail.mcn.org

Brewer 46
Susan Meckley
P.O. Box 5038
Coast Guard Island
Alameda, CA 94501
suemeckely@earthlink.net

Brewer Ahquabi
(One-off steel 45-foot pilot house cutter.) For information about this or other Brewer designs, contact:
Ted Brewer
Box 187
Lyman, WA 98263
360-826-1140

Bristol 26 Owners' Association
John Jarrell
KUZNJOHN@aol.com
John is looking for others who would like to start an owner's group.

Bristol 29.9 Owners' Association
Nicholas Bauer
883 Hayes St.
San Francisco, CA 94117-2413
nickbauer@msn.com
Nick is looking for others who would like to start an owner's group.

Bristol Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/bristol/index.htm

Bristol Channel Cutter
http://www.samlmorse.com
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Buccaneer Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/buccaneer/index.htm

C

C&C Sailing Club (Chesapeake Bay)
P.O. Box 4263
Annapolis, MD 21403

C&C Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/c&c/index.htm

Cal Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/cal/index.htm

Cal 35C
Howard Hansen
P.O. Box 7892
Santa Rosa, CA 95407-0892

Caliber Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/caliber/index.htm

Cape George Yachts (Cecil M. Lange and Son, Inc.)
1924 Cape George Road
Port Townsend, WA 98368
360-385-3412
360-385-6656 (fax)

Caprice (see Twin-Keeler Newsletter)

Catalina 22 National Association
Don Carsten
6230 Lewis #204
Temperance, MI 48182
313-847-4041
dpcarsten@juno.com
http://www.spiritone.com/~mack/c22.htm

Catalina 320 National Association
Roger Elliott
2167 Stillspring Place
Martinez, CA 94553
510-372-6945
relliott@pacbell.net
http://www.catalina320.org

Catalina Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/catalina/index.htm

Chris-Craft (Apache, Comanche, Cherokee, Capri, Caribbean) Owners' Association
Robert Pemberton
209 Haynesworth
Sumter, SC 29150
803-773-2160
pemberton@sumter.net
http://people.ne.mediaone.net/dje/ccsail.htm
Robert has started an owners' association for all Chris-Craft sailboats. The group has 145 members. Publishes a newsletter, the Helmsman.

Chrysler Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/chrysler/index.htm

Columbia 45-57 Cruising Club
Joe Bennett
Tripp50@earthlink.net
http://home.earthlink.net/~tripp50/

Columbia Sailing Association
http://www.capoferri.com/csa/cindex.htm

Columbia Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/columbia/

Com-Pac Owners' Association
http://www2.dgsys.com/~jeffries/index.html
An active email discussion group is accessible from the website.

D

Dickerson
Frazer Watkins
fairlee@visuallink.com
http://www.willoworks.com/dickerson/index.htm

Dolphin 24 (see Sparkman & Stephens)

Dufour
Steve Ritzi
Box 307
Portland, ME 04101
ritzman@aol.com
http://members.aol.com/ritzman/dufour

Dufour Arpege 30
John Moede
2148 Roblyn Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55104

Dufour Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/dufour/index.htm

E

Eight Metre Class Association
John Lammerts Van Bueren
Gasthuisstraat 4
4161 CC Heukelum
Holland
+31-345-619788
+31-345-616905 (fax)
eightmetre@ixs.nl

Ericson 27 Fleet One
Amy Lee
$15 a year to join. This group produces an owners' manual and a newsletter. It also sponsors races, cruises, and events. (We know this group is out there, but it seems that Amy changed her email address recently. If you know how to locate this group, please contact us.)

Ericson 32
Cory Bolton
cbolton@halcyon.com
Cory would like to hear from and share information with other Ericson 32 owners.

Ericson 39
Mike Stanich
642 Marina Pky, #51
Chula Vista, CA 91910
619-476-8081
windrunner_boat@juno.com
Mike would like to hear from and share information with other Ericson 39 owners.

Ericson Owners' Association (Chesapeake)
Nancy Tuttle
503 Bridge St.
Collegeville, PA 19426
610-287-5381
njt@worldlynx.net
http://www.capoferri.com/ericson/eindex.htm

Ericson Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/ericson/index.htm

F

Fales Navigator
John Walker
MGMT501@aol.com

Falmouth Cutter
http://www.samlmorse.com
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Finngulf
http://www.rodgersyachtsales.com/finngulf.html
This is a U.S. distributor; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.
http://www.finngulf.com
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Fisher
Harry Johnson
6401 S. West Shore Drive, Apt. 203
Tampa, FL 33616
harryj@dbn.lia.net

Flicka
Rod Bruckdorfer
1711 Covington St.
Baltimore, MD 21230
410-727-3618
Seagypsy@worldnet.att.net
http://home.att.net/~seagypsy/

Fuji Sailboats
Bill Ashenhart
bgashenhart@sbec.com
http://members.tripod.com/~Bill_Ashenhart/index.html

G

Grampian
Bill and Leslie Hughes
80 The Paddock
Williamsville, NY 14221
716-633-0234 (days)
716-626-1044 (evenings)
715-626-9147 (fax)
Lesl1@aol.com

Golden Hind (see Twin-Keeler Newsletter)

H

Hallberg-Rassy
West Coast Yachts
1836 Westlake Ave. N., Suite 210
Seattle, WA 98109
206-298-3724
206-298-0227 (fax)
wcy@seanet.com
http://yachtworld.com/wcy
This is a distributor; they may have information about an owners' association.

Hallberg-Rassy
Tomas Rassy
Hallberg-Rassy Varvs AB
SE-474 31 Ellos
Sweden
tomas.rassy@hallberg-rassy.se
http://www.hallberg-rassy.com
This is the manufacturer. Tomas is a good contact for European owners' associations.

Hunter Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/hunter/index.htm

Hurley 22
Joe and Denise Scott
115 Gardner Ave.
Cornwall, Ontario
Canada K6H 5H5
613-932-2252
613-933-5051 (fax)
scott@cnwl.igs.net

Hylas Owners' Association
Sheldon Gawiser
102 Hillspoint Road
Westport, CT 06880
srg@regen.com

I

Irwin Sailboats
Jim O'Neill
338 Hampton Ct.
Lexington, KY 40508
606-745-0533 (days)
606-258-9031 (evenings)
606-745-4255 (fax)
jimon@worldnet.att.net
Jim has agreed to serve as a contact for other Irwin owners.

Island Packet Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/islpkt/index.htm

Islander 24
F. Kurt Cylke
5 Elm St.
Geneseo, NY 14454
716-243-1867
cylke@uno.cc.geneseo.edu

Islander Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/islander/index.htm

J

J/Boats Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/jboats/index.htm

Jeanneau Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/jeanneau/index.htm

Jonmeri
http://www.rodgersyachtsales.com/jonmeri.html
This is a U.S. distributor; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

K

Kelly-Peterson 44
Jeffrey Stander
2401 N. Northlake Way
Seattle, WA 98103
800-945-7375
800-945-7967 (fax)
jstander@anzus-technology.com
http://www.anzus-technology.com/kp44
Jeff has an automatic email mailing list. To join, send an email to majordomo@anzus-technology.com with the line "subscribe kp44-l" in the body (not the subject) of the email.

Kendall 32
Bud Taplin
1602 Monrovia St.
Newport Beach, CA 92663
714-549-9331
800-310-WORLD
714-631-0313 (fax)
btaplin@westsail.com

Kettenburg
Gary Petty
8130 La Mesa Blvd., #219
La Mesa, CA 91941
619-226-1727
gpetty@flash.net
Gary is a member of the Ancient Mariners Sailing Society, who keep an "unofficial database" of all the K-boats they can locate, and they have information resources as well.

Kodiak (see Nimble Boat Club)

L

Lancer
Donald Bill
9 Piedmont Lane
Palmyra, VA 22963
804-758-4256
donbill@hotmail.com
Don has agreed to serve as a contact for other Lancer sailors.

Lazyjack Schooner Newsletter
Jim Montgomery
2578 Rue Palafox
Biloxi, MS 39531

M

MacGregor Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/macgregor/index.htm

Malo
http://www.maloyachts.se
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Mariner
Charles Felder
P.O. Box 2380
Vineyard Haven, MA 02568
cfelder@capecod.net

Mason
Joe Meglen: 714-496-4848
Bob Pooler: 207-244-7534
These are distributors; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Maxi Boats (9.5 meter) by Pelle Petterson
Harry Muller
WHMuller@osp.com
Harry agreed to serve as a contact for other 9.5 Maxi owners.

Maxi Boats
http://www.nimbus.se
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Montgomery Owners' Newsletter
Terry Schwarze
schwarze@vax2.winona.msus.edu

Montgomery Email Discussion List
Keith Diehl
kdiehl@xmission.com
Anyone with an interest in Montgomery boats is welcome on the list. The membership of 100 includes original builder Jerry Montgomery and current builder Bob Eeg. To subscribe, send mail to majordomo@xmission.com with only "subscribe montgomery_boats" in the body of the message. You will receive an automated reply message with a "cookie" that must be returned to confirm your subscription. Instructions are included in the message.

Morgan 22 Webpage
Michael Kamen
5040 Haley Center
Alburn University, AL 36849
334-844-6795
kamenmi@mail.auburn.edu
http://www.auburn.edu/~kamenmi

Morgan 41 Webpage
Tim Margeson
http://www.pacifier.com/~sailing

Morgan Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/morgan/index.htm

Morgan Yacht Division of Catalina
Warren Pandy and Lon Seay
7200 Bryan Daity Rd.
Largo, FL 33777
813-544-6681
One of our readers was so impressed with this company's service in older parts and interest in his good old Morgan, he asked that the company be listed along with the rest of the contacts for Morgan.

Moore 24 Class Association
Fred Cox
650-937-2985
flc@netscape.com
http://people.netscape.com/flc/Moore.html

N

Najad
http://www.najad.se
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Neptune
Gary Scurlock
17402 Bellewood Dr.
Hammond, LA 70401
gskully@i-55.com

Nimble Boat Club
(Includes Nimble 30, Wanderer, Kodiak, and Arctic motorsailers and Nimble powerboats)
Ted Brewer
Box 187
Lyman, WA 98263
360-826-1140

Norge
Tom Ciferno
114 Woodbridge Crossing
Chardon, OH 44024
440-286-1190
TomCif@aol.com

Nor'Sea 27
Seymour Shapiro
P.O. Box 6
Kemah, TX 77565
seymours@bigfoot.com

Nor'Sea Owners' Newsletter and Website
Greg and Jill Delezynski
660 Bair Island Road, #24
Redwood City, CA 94063
650-261-1391
G-J-DELEZYNSKI@worldnet.att.net
http://home.att.net/~g-j-delezynski/

Nor'Sea Website
marbeth@ix.netcom.com
http://www.vander-bend.com/norsea

O

O'Day Mariner Website
http://www.geocities.com/Colosseum/Field/8975/

O'Day Tempest
Anthony Fokas
Ten Plaza St., Apt. 3J
Brooklyn, NY 11238
718-230-8655
718-398-7704 (fax)
phocas@worldnet.att.net

O'Day Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/oday/index.htm

Ohlson 38
Robert Germain
germain@coastnet.com
Yes, Virginia, there really is an Ohlson and an Olson. Robert Germain is the frustrated owner of an Ohlson 38, a Swedish design built in England by Tyler Yachts. Since he can't find one anywhere, Robert's starting his own Ohlson appreciation association.

P

Pacific Seacraft Owners' Association (Northwest)
360-299-2526
chartercw@seacraft.com

Pacific Seacraft Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/pacificseacraft/index.htm

Passport Yachts East
326 First Street, Suite 14
Annapolis, MD 21403
800-394-8014
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Pearson 26 Page
Dan Pfeiffer
60 Lake Edge Dr.
Euclid, OH 44123
216-261-1311
danp@en.com
http://www.en.com/users/danp

Pearson 28 Page
Ron Davis
5505 Honey Dew Terrace
Austin, TX 78749
CptinRn@aol.com
http://members.aol.com/CptinRn/mystic.html

Pearson Ensign
Jay Robinson
21505 Lake George Blvd.
Anoka, MN 55303
612-753-3982
argos@skypoint.com
http://members.tripod.com/~ensign2/ensign.html

Pearson Resolute
M. Brent Boydston
132 N. Third St.
Box 5113
Durant, OK 74702
580-924-4455
580-924-0453 (fax)
mbrent@redriverok.com

Pearson Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/pearson/index.htm

R

Ranger 20 (Kent Ranger Sailing Association)
Mark Kelsey
4718 South 295th Place
Auburn, WA 98001-1556
253-941-9938

Ranger Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/ranger/index.htm

Rhodes Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/rhodes/index.htm

S

S2 Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/S2/

Sabre Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/sabre/index.htm

Sailstar Corsair
George and Marilyn Fricke
P.O. Box 1203
Occidental, CA 95465
707-874-1035
gfast@neteze.com

San Juan 26 and 7.7
Greg Aplin
206 West 12th St.
Benton, KY 42025
502-527-7625
Greg@trpeople.com
http://www.trpeople.com/SJ26

Santana 22 Class Association
spitzer@cruzio.com
http://www2.cruzio.com/~spitzer/S22.htm

Santana 525 Website
Eric Roline
roline@usit.net
http://www.angelfire.com/tn/santana525/

Seafarer 31
Christopher D'Aleo
RR 1, Box 1E
Amenia, NY 12501
914-373-9320

Seafarer Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/seafarer/

Sea-Skiff
David Carnell
322 Pages Creek Dr.
Wilmington, NC 28411-7850
910-686-4184
DaveCarnell@worldnet.att.net

Sea Tiger 34
Bob Serotini
1712 White Ave.
Beloit, WI 53511
608-365-0300
bserotin@sdb.k12.wi.us

Seawolf
Gus and Meg Goncalves
P.O. Box 23361
Hilton Head Island, SC 29925
megatsea@aol.com

Seidleman 25
Ron Lee
RLee623517@aol.com

Silhouette (see Twin-Keeler Newsletter)

6 Meter Association (Puget Sound)
Peter Hofmann
8955 Woodbank Dr.
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110
206-842-7362

Skipper 20
Ken Young
3833 SW 17th Pl.
Cape Coral, FL 33914
KYoung@iline.com

Sparkman & Stephens (S&S)
(Dolphin 24 and others)
Jim Huxford
125 West Dee St.
Lebanon, IL 62254
618-537-2278
jhuxford@apci.net

Stevepra
Robert Bofferding
1 Corey Ave.
St. Pete Beach, FL 33706-1812
727-367-7594
RBOFF@prodigy.net
Robert's wondering if he has the world's only 1970 Stevepra schooner . . . or does it just feel like that?

Swan
http://www.nautors-swan.com
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

T

Tanzer 22 Class Association
P.O. Box 22
Ste. Anne De Bellevue, Quebec
Canada H9X 3L4
http://www.synapse.net/~alfas/sail/tanzer22/t22.htm
This organization publishes a regular newsletter, Tanzer Talk. It also includes other Tanzer owners as members.

Tanzer 26
Michael McGoldrick
mcsail@magma.com
http://www.magma.ca/~mcsail/taz/tanzer26.htm

Tartan 30 Page
Paul Nickerson
T30SAILOR@aol.com
http://members.aol.com/T30SAILOR/index.html

Tartan Blackwatch
Martin Burs
111 Jackson St.
Santa Cruz, CA 95060
408-426-5332 (days) 408-469-9920 (evenings)
408-426-1220 (fax)
sailr@rocketmail.com
http://205.215.232.6/tartanblackwatch

Tartan Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/tartan/

Taswell Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/taswell/index.htm

Tayana Email Discussion List
http://www.sailnet.com/list/tayana/

True North
Dave Dietrich
7900 N. Virginia St. #115
Reno, NV 89506
dietrichdr@hotmail.com

Twin-Keeler Newsletter
(for Alacrities, Caprices, Silhouettes, Golden Hinds, Vivacities, Westerlies, etc.)
Craig Anderson
and Brian Backstrand
2943 Balmoral Ave., #2
Chicago, IL 60625
ceadma@aol.com
bebackstr@aol.com
For owners and admirers of bilge-keel sailboats.Four issues per year. $10 US. $15 Overseas. Contact Craig for a free copy.

V

Vega Association (American)
Sidney Rosen
10615 Whitman Circle
Orlando, FL 32821
407-352-9250
SIDNOCK@aol.com
http://www.targetsoft.com/vega

Victoria 18
Jerry Wrenn
jbwrenn@texoma.net
http://home.texoma.net/~jbwrenn/Welcome.htm

Vivacity (see Alacrity and Twin-Keeler Newsletter)

W

Wanderer (see Nimble Boat Club)

Watkins 27
http://www.angelfire.com/fl/watkinssailboats/index.html

Wauquiez Owners' Group
http://www.sailnet.com/list/wauquiez/index.htm

Westerly Owners' Association
Jackie and Tim Pullen
19 Willowdale Close
Petersfield, Hants
England GU32 3PS
+44-1730-266178 (phone)
+44-1730-268898 (fax)
woa.admin@westerly.co.uk
http://www.westerly.co.uk
The 1,800-strong Westerly Owners' Association welcomes new members who own Westerly boats, from anywhere in the world. Contact and exchange of members' experiences, including technical tips, is maintained through a twice-yearly 90-100 page booklet (the WOA Newsletter), and a growing program of rallies organized by area groups in the UK and Channel Islands.

Westerly Owners' Email Discussion List
Stephen Ames
sames@mindspring.com
Discussion group for Westerly sailboats and other twin-keelers.

Westerly Owners' Association (American)
Joe Douglas
P.O. Box 637
Goodland Dr. West
Goodland, FL 34140
Annual subscription of $10 includes a newsletter.

Westerly (see Twin-Keeler Newsletter)

Westsail Contact
Bud Taplin (see Kendall 32 for address)
btaplin@westsail.com
http://www.westsail.com/

Wharram Catamaran
http://www.multihulls.uk.com/pca

X

X-Yachts
http://www.xyachts.dk
This is the manufacturer; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.
xyachts@aol.com
This is a distributor; they may have information about any formal or informal owners' organizations.

Y

Yamaha
George Zimmerman
yamaha25@aol.com
George says Yamaha is still making sailboats primarily for sale in Japan and other Asian countries. During the 1970s they sold models in the range of 24, 25, 28, 30, and 33 feet in the U.S. and Canada.

Yankee
Steve Botts
597 Dove Ct.
Pleasant Hill, CA 94523
925-947-3919
Steve.Botts@geis.ge.com
http://members.xoom.com/steve_botts/yankee30.htm

Yankee Dolphin (see Sparkman & Stephens)

Help! Who's got contacts for these boats?

Acajutla
Allegra
Annapolis 30
Aragpsa
Arco 33
Asia West/Newport
Balboa
Benford
Blanchard
Bombay
Bounty
Britannia
Cabot 36
Cape Cod H-26
Carena
Carter
Celebrity
Challenger
Chita-Peterson
Clarion of Wight
Clearwater
Clipper
Concordia
Cooper
Crosby
CT-38
Dana
Davis
Deerfoot
Dockrell
Dole
Douglas 31/32 (Ted Brewer design)
Easterly
Eden
Elite
Enass
Endeavour 37
Endurance
Ensenada
Excalibur
Explorer 45
Falmouth Cutter
Formosa
Freeport
Freya 39
Fryco

Galion 22
Glass Slipper
Glen-L
Globe
Gulf
HC-41T
Hartley
Hedoniste
Heritage
Hinterhoeller
HJB Cumulant
Holland
Horizon
Hullmaster 27
Jason 35
Jonque
Kaiser
Kolal
La Paz
Legend
Lindenberg
LM
Maple Leaf
Margarita
Melody
Mercury Sloop
Mistral Class Association (International)
Montego
Moonfleet
Murray 33
Mystic
Mystique
Nautilus
Niagara
Nordia
Nordic
Oceanic 42 and 46
Ontario
Orion

Passage
Perry
Pratique
Quasar
Quickstep 24
Reinell
Roberts
Rob Roy 23
Royal Passport
Saturna
Sea Pearl 28
Seastar 460
Sirocco
Skye 51
Starlight
Ta Chiao
Tasar
Topper
Trapper
Tripp 30
Union 32
Vagabond
Vancouver
Viper 830
Vitrand
Voyager
Wally
Warrior
Whitbread 30
Willard
Windrose

ENGLISH AND METRIC WRENCHES: WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU REALLY NEED TWO . . .
Many good old boats have a combination of English (inch) and metric (millimeter) fasteners. The deluxe solution to the problem of having to work with both systems is to have two full sets of tools. However having two full sets of everything is expensive, heavy, and takes up a lot of space. It is probably common for sailors to have a set of combination wrenches in each system and perhaps even a set of sockets and hex wrenches ä a far-from-complete solution. There will be times when you will want two same-sized box or open-end wrenches. If you have combination wrenches, you will have to resort to an adjustable open-end wrench, which is a poor substitute for a box or even an open-end wrench.

Some English wrenches will fit metric fasteners, and some metric wrenches will fit English fasteners. We've worked up two lists because not all substitutions work in both directions. For example, a 13-mm wrench will work fairly well on a 1/2-inch nut, but a 1/2-inch wrench will not fit a 13-mm nut at all. That seems strange, but remember that, due to the tolerances on the fasteners and the tools, the fasteners are two different sizes and the wrenches are also two different sizes. The result is four unique dimensions in total.

Simply converting from inch to millimeter and back will leave you with misleading matches. In order to make this table, we found it necessary to actually try each tool on each fastener. Obviously wherever possible, using the native tools and fasteners is best, but when you need them, these selections will work for you. So here are Good Old Boat's picks for tools that can cross from one system to another:

If you are working with metric fasteners:
7 mm. 9/32 in.
8 mm. 5/16 in.
11 mm. 7/16 in.
14 mm. 9/16 in.
19 mm. 3/4 in.
21 mm. 13/16 in.
22 mm. 7/8 in.

If you are working with English fasteners:
5/16 in. 8 mm.
11/32 in. 9 mm.
7/16 in. 11 mm.
1/2 in. 13 mm.
9/16 in. 14 mm.
5/8 in. 16 mm.
3/4 in. 19 mm.
13/16 in. 21 mm.
7/8 in. 22 mm.
15/16 in. 24 mm.

Six-point wrenches are more forgiving than twelve-point ones are, but the list above will work with both. I just wrote the alternate wrench selection on my tool pouch below the "first choice" wrench size for each pocket.


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Published October, 1998